What do the terms Assessed Value, State Equalized Value and Taxable Value mean on my Notice of Assessment?
A basic knowledge of these terms will help you better understand Michigan property tax law.

Assessed Value - The assessed value helps determine market value. Set by the assessor, the Assessed Value when multiplied by two will give an approximate market value of the property. The assessor is constitutionally required to set the assessed value at 50% of the usual selling price or True Cash Value of the property.

State Equalized Value (SEV) – SEV is the Assessed Value that has been adjusted following county and state equalization. The County Board of Commissioners and the Michigan State Tax Commission must review local assessments and adjust (equalize) them if they are above or below the constitutional 50% level of assessment.

Taxable Value – Taxable value divided by 1,000 times the local millage rate will determine your tax liability. Taxable value increases from year to year by the rate of inflation or 5%, whichever is lower. Transfers of ownership and improvements to the property will increase the Taxable Value more than the rate of inflation.

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1. When are my taxes due?
2. Can I access my tax account online?
3. I need a copy of a paid receipt. Where can I get one?
4. Who receives the funds from my summer and winter tax bills?
5. How do I make an address change for the tax bill?
6. What do the terms Assessed Value, State Equalized Value and Taxable Value mean on my Notice of Assessment?
7. How does the Assessor determine my Assessed Value?
8. What determines the Taxable Value?
9. What other factors would cause an increase in my taxes?
10. Property values in my neighborhood have been decreasing. Will my property valuation be decreasing as well?
11. Does this mean I’ll have to pay more property taxes instead of less?
12. Why won’t my taxes always decrease if my property value is going down?
13. Will my taxes ever go down?
14. What are some of the disadvantages about the Proposal A legislation?
15. What is the Principal Residence Exemption?
16. Can I contest my Assessed Value and Taxable?
17. What is a mill and, if I don’t have access to the internet, how can I determine my tax amount?
18. What are my payment options? Can I pay online or by phone? Can I pay with credit card, or debit card or e-check?